Smoking and Stress

Ask Floridians why they still smoke and you often hear that cigarette smoking “relieves stress.” While most people know the serious health risks of smoking and the benefits of quitting, giving up cigarettes as a way to cope with stress can be really tough.

But Here’s the Truth About Smoking and Stress

Tobacco use is a serious addiction, and nicotine is the primary drug in tobacco that causes addiction. It only takes 10 seconds for the nicotine from one puff of a cigarette to reach your brain. This fast delivery of nicotine from the lungs to the brain is one of the reasons cigarettes are so addictive. And once it gets there, nicotine causes cells in the brain to release dopamine. One of the effects of dopamine is to create a heightened sense of alertness and contentment. Dopamine controls the brain’s reward and pleasure centers. Over time, your brain cells are changed to expect the regular bursts of extra dopamine that result from smoking. When you try to quit, or even between cigarette breaks, these brain changes cause strong cravings for more nicotine.[1]

You may feel calmer and less stressed during and right after a cigarette. But smoking isn’t actually relieving the stress in your life. It’s just relieving your craving for nicotine. In fact, your body is experiencing quite the opposite. Smoking increases your blood pressure and heart rate, tenses your muscles, contracts blood vessels, and reduces your blood oxygen level.[2] Basically, smoking increases the stress level of your body.

Dealing with Stress

Stress is part of life, from major life events to daily hassles. Even happy moments, like holidays or parties, can be stressful. So if you’re trying to quit smoking, it’s important to find ways to handle stress and take care of yourself without cigarettes.

Below are some tips. Try them out. And come up with your own ideas. If something doesn’t work for you‚ no big deal. Just try something else. Keep looking for healthy ways to deal with stress, which will make quitting smoking easier.

  • Take a break. Even if it’s just for a few minutes. Take a break from what you’re doing whether you’re at home or at work.
  • Deep breathing. Instead of inhaling toxic smoke, try fresh air. Take slow deep breaths. Close your eyes and then breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth.
  • Exercise. Get moving to increase endorphins, the body’s feel-good chemicals, which naturally boost your mood. Exercise also decreases stress hormones. Even going for a walk can help.
  • Take care of yourself. Especially during stressful times of the year, it’s important to take good care of yourself. Eat healthy balanced meals, drink lots of water, and get enough sleep.
  • Make time for yourself. Sometimes it’s difficult to follow the tips above when you have a lot going on. So try to keep your days organized, and schedule time for yourself.
  • Ready to quit smoking? We have free tools and services that can help. Go to tobaccofreeflorida.com/quityourway.


    Sources:

    [1] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Printed with corrections, January 2014.

    [2] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010.


    Why Smoking is Especially Bad if You or Your Family Have Asthma and/or Allergies

    What Is Asthma?

    Asthma is a chronic disease that affects the airways of the lungs, which are tubes that carry air to your lungs.1 During an asthma attack, these airways become swollen, making it hard to breathe. As the walls of the airways swell, they narrow, and less air is passes in and out of the lungs. Cells in the airways can also make more mucus (a sticky, thick liquid) than usual, which can make breathing even harder.2 Asthma attacks can be mild, moderate, or serious—and even life-threatening.

    Symptoms of an asthma attack include:

    • Coughing
    • Shortness of breath or trouble breathing
    • Wheezing
    • Tightness or pain in the chest

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    What Are Allergies?

    Allergies are one of the most common chronic diseases. A chronic disease lasts a long time or occurs often. An allergy occurs when the body’s immune system sees a substance as harmful and overreacts to it. The substances that cause allergic reactions are called allergens. When someone has allergies, their immune system makes an antibody called immunoglobulin E (IgE). These antibodies respond to allergens. The physical symptoms that result are an allergic reaction.3

    How Is Smoking Related to Asthma and/or Allergies?

    Exposure to secondhand smoke can increase the risk of allergic complications such as sinusitis and bronchitis. Common symptoms of smoke irritation are burning or watery eyes, nasal congestion, coughing, hoarseness and shortness of breath presenting as a wheeze.4

    Tobacco smoke is also one of the most common asthma triggers, putting the 1.6 million Floridians with asthma at risk for an attack.5,6 If you have asthma, an asthma attack can occur when something irritates your airways and “triggers” an attack. Your triggers might be different from other people’s triggers.7

    Tobacco smoke—including secondhand smoke—is unhealthy for everyone, but especially people with asthma.8 Secondhand smoke is a mixture of gases and fine particles that includes:9

    • Smoke from a burning cigarette, cigar, or pipe
    • Smoke exhaled (breathed out) by someone who smokes

    Secondhand smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals, including hundreds that are toxic and about 70 that can cause cancer.10

    If you have asthma, it’s important that you avoid exposure to secondhand smoke.11 If you are among the 21.8 percent of adults in Florida who have asthma and smoke, the best thing you can do to help control asthma symptoms is to quit smoking.12

    Children with asthma are particularly vulnerable to secondhand smoke exposure. Approximately one in 10 children in Florida have asthma, and studies show that asthma-effected children who are around secondhand smoke have more severe and frequent attacks.13,14

    How Can Asthma Attacks Be Prevented?

    Smokers with asthma have an increased risk of experiencing more severe symptoms like wheezing, breathlessness, chest-tightness and coughing.15,16

    If you or a family member has asthma, you can manage it with the help of your health care provider (for example, by taking your medicines exactly as your doctor tells you) and by avoiding triggers. Staying far away from tobacco smoke is one important way to avoid asthma attacks.

    Parents can protect their asthmatic children by taking steps to reduce overall secondhand smoke exposure. These steps include:

    • If you smoke, quit. Tobacco Free Florida’s FREE services can increase your chances of quitting, visit tobaccofreeflorida.com/howtoquit for more information.
    • Help children avoid secondhand smoke exposure indoors, in vehicles or in public areas where smoking is permitted.
    • Take caution outdoors, as there is evidence that the average levels of smoke found near someone smoking outdoors is similar to the levels of tobacco smoke found indoors.17

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    References

    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Asthma’s Impact on the Nation: Data From the CDC National Asthma Control Program
    2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.“Allergy Overview.” Allergies. Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, Sept. 2015. Web. .
    3. “Cigarette Smoke.” National Institute of Health – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Web. .
    4. Florida Department of Health, Division of Community Health Promotion, Bureau of Chronic Disease Prevention, Florida Asthma Program. Burden of Asthma in Florida, 2013.
    5. Health, National Center For Environmental. “Asthma’s Impact on the Nation Data from the CDC National Asthma Control Program.” (n.d.): n. pag.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Environmental Health Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, 2010. Web. 10 Mar. 2016. .
    6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    7. Asthma: Common Asthma TriggersWeb. 20 Aug. 2012.
    8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    9. Asthma: Common Asthma TriggersWeb. 20 Aug. 2012.
    10. National Toxicology Program. Report on Carcinogens, Twelfth Edition. Research Triangle Park (NC): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Toxicology Program, 2011.
    11. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010.
    12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    13. Asthma: Common Asthma TriggersWeb. 20 Aug. 2012.
    14. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    15. Asthma Stats: Percentage of People With Asthma Who Smoke. Web. 31 Jan. 2013.
    16. Forest, Jamie, and Julie Dudley. “The Burden of Asthma in Florida.” (2013): 19. Florida Department of Health. Bureau of Chronic Disease Prevention in the Division of Community Health Promotion, Sept. 2013. Web. 9 Mar. 2016. .
    17. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006.
    18. “Learn How to Control Asthma.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 01 Feb. 2016. Web. 09 Mar. 2016. .
    19. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006.
    20. Klepeis, NE, WR Ott, and P. Switzer. “Real-time Measurement of Outdoor Tobacco Smoke Particles.” US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health. Journal of Air & Waste Management Association, May 2007. Web. 09 Mar. 2016. .

    How to Talk to Your Kids About Tobacco

    For decades, young people sneaking a cigarette or dip in the backyard out of their parents’ sight was dismissed as a rite of passage. Unfortunately, these exact moments are when tobacco use begins and for far too many kids leads to a lifetime of addiction. It may seem difficult to talk with your kids about tobacco, especially when it seems there are so many other dangers out there. However, the conversation can’t wait because nine out of 10 smokers start by age 18.[1] Every day, more than 3,200 youth (younger than 18 years of age) try smoking for the first time and 2,100 youth and young adults become regular addicted smokers.[2] Here are some tips to help you prepare for a conversation:
    • If you smoke, the best thing you can do for your own health and your child’s health is to quit. Research shows that kids who have a parent who smokes are more likely to smoke and to be heavier smokers at young ages.[3] However, the good news is that when parents quit smoking, their kids become less likely to start smoking and more likely to quit if they already smoke.[4]
    • Address the problem, don’t ignore it. Despite what kids might have you believe, studies show that parents can have a significant impact on their kid’s behavior, such as whether or not to use tobacco products.[5]
    • Become involved in your kids’ lives and social schedules. Young people whose friends use tobacco are more likely to use tobacco themselves to try to fit in. Meanwhile, kids who do well in school and participate in structured, extra-curricular activities are less likely to be susceptible to smoking.[6]
    • Educate yourself about e-cigarettes, even if you don’t use them yourself. With the growing trend of youth using e-cigarettes, here are some important things you should know:
      • In Florida, the number of high school students who were current e-cigarette users has increased from 2013 to 2015.[7]
      • One in three Florida high school students has tried an e-cigarette.[8]
      • In 2014, for the first time, more Florida teens used e-cigarettes than any other tobacco product.[9]
      • Here are some tips for protecting youth from the dangers of e-cigarettes:
        • Don’t leave liquid nicotine unattended, at all. Nicotine is a strong poison that can cause serious illness or death if swallowed. Even in very small amounts.
        • Kids can order tobacco and e-cigarettes online, so check deliveries to your home and check your credit cards for unexpected charges.
        • Check their backpacks to know what they are bringing home.
        • E-cigarettes typically won’t make clothes smell of tobacco smoke. If you don’t smell tobacco on them, don’t assume they aren’t using products with nicotine.
        • Some e-cigarettes require charging, so check to see what devices are being charged or if you see an unusual plug.
    • Back up the conversation with facts they can relate to. Tobacco use remains the leading preventable cause of death in the United States[10] and here are some quick facts that can help sway the conversation in your favor to prevent them from using tobacco.
      • Tobacco use is responsible for about 480,000 deaths a year in the U.S.[11] That’s about one in five deaths annually, and more than 1,300 deaths every day.
      • On average, smokers die at least 10 years earlier than non-smokers.[12]
      • For every person who dies from smoking, about 30 more people suffer from one or more serious illnesses caused by smoking.[13]
      • Because the adolescent brain is still developing, nicotine use during adolescence can disrupt the formation of brain circuits that control attention, learning and susceptibility to addiction.[14]
      • Most teens are not able to quit due to the addicting properties of nicotine. In fact, only one in three young smokers will quit, and one of those remaining smokers will die from tobacco-related causes.[15]
      • Nicotine is highly addictive.[16] The pathway for addiction to nicotine is similar to those for heroin and cocaine.[17]
      • While smoking-related diseases usually occur years after a person starts, smoking has immediate effects on the body.[18] Early cardiovascular damage is seen in most young smokers; those most sensitive die very young.[19]
      • Smoking also reduces lung function and retards lung growth. Teens who smoke are not only short of breath today, but they also may end up as adults with lungs that will never grow to full capacity. Such damage is permanent and increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.[20]
      • There are more than 7,000 chemicals in cigarette smoke, at least 250 are toxic and about 70 are known to cause cancer.[21]
    These numbers are powerful, and so are real-life stories. If you know someone who died or is suffering because of tobacco use, share their story with your kids. Create a world where seeing people smoke or use other tobacco products is the exception, not the norm. Learn how you can get involved in your community by visiting www.tobaccofreeflorida.com/getinvolved.

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    [1] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2014). The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health.
    [2] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Printed with corrections, January 2014.
    [3] Gilman, SE, et al., “Parental Smoking and Adolescent Smoking Initiation: An Intergenerational Perspective on Tobacco Control,” Pediatrics 123(2): e274-e281, February 2009. Bauman, K, et al., “Effect of parental smoking classification on the association between parental and adolescent smoking,” Addictive Behaviors 15(5):413-22, 1990. See also, Osler, M, et al., “Maternal smoking during childhood and increased risk of smoking in young adulthood,” International Journal of Epidemiology 24(4):710-4, August 1995.
    [4] Farkas, A, et al., “Does parental smoking cessation discourage adolescent smoking,” Preventive Medicine 28(3):213-8, March 1999.
    [5] Newman, I, et al., “The influence of parental attitude and behavior on early adolescent cigarette smoking,” Journal of School Health 59(4):150-2, April 1989. See also, Distefan, J, et al., “Parental influences predict adolescent smoking in the United States, 1989-1993,” Journal of Adolescent Health 22:466-74, 1998.
    [6] Resnick, M, et al., “Protecting adolescents from harm: Findings from the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health,” Journal of the American Medical Association 278(10):823-32, 1997. See, also, Kellam, S, et al., “Targeting early antecedents to prevent tobacco smoking: Findings from an epidemiologically based randomized field trial,” American Journal of Public Health 88(10):1490-95, October 1998.
    [7] Florida Youth Tobacco Survey (FYTS), Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology, 2015.
    [8] Florida Youth Tobacco Survey (FYTS), Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology, 2014.
    [9] Florida Youth Tobacco Survey (FYTS), Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology, 2014.
    [10] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.
    [11] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.
    [12] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.
    [13] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.
    [14] England, L. et al. Nicotine and the Developing Human: A Neglected Element of the E -cigarette Debate. Am J Prev Med. 2015 Mar 7. [Epub ahead of print].
    [15] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Preventing Tobacco Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2012.
    [16] USDHHS. The Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA.: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.
    [17] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: Nicotine Addiction. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 1988. DHHS Publication No. (CDC) 88-8406.
    [18] American Academy of Pediatrics October 1998 Child Health Month Report: The Risks of Tobacco Use: A Message to Parents and Teens; Milam, JE, “Perceived invulnerability and cigarette smoking among adolescents,” Addictive Behaviors 25(1):71-80, January-February 2000.
    [19] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Preventing Tobacco Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2012.
    [20] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Preventing Tobacco Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2012.
    [21] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US); National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (US); Office on Smoking and Health (US). How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta (GA): Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US); 2010.

    How Does Smoking Damage Your Heart?

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States.[1] About every 25 seconds, someone in the U.S. will have a coronary event. And every minute, someone will die from a coronary event.[2] Smoking is a major cause of  heart disease for both men and women. Breathing tobacco smoke causes changes in your blood. Your triglyceride level rises, and your “good cholesterol” level falls. The chemicals in tobacco smoke also prevent your body from repairing damaged places in the lining of your arteries. Clots are more likely to form in a damaged artery.[4] Smoking is one cause of dangerous plaque buildup inside your arteries. Plaque is made of cholesterol and scar tissue. It clogs and narrows your arteries. This can trigger chest pain, weakness, heart attack, or stroke. Plaque can rupture and cause clots that block arteries. Completely blocked arteries can cause sudden death.[4] Tobacco  smoke poses a serious risk, even to nonsmokers. Secondhand smoke causes nearly 34,000 premature deaths from heart disease each year in the U.S. among nonsmokers.[5] Inhaling someone else’s tobacco smoke could be enough to block arteries and trigger a heart attack in someone whose arteries are silently clogged.[4] Nonsmokers who are exposed to secondhand smoke at home or at work increase their risk of developing heart disease by 25 to 30 percent.[6] While cigarette smoking alone can increase the risk of heart disease, when coupled with other factors like high blood pressure, unhealthy cholesterol levels, inactivity, poor diet, family history and obesity, the risk is greatly increased.[7] Even young smokers are at risk. Smoking during adolescence and young adulthood causes early damage to the abdominal aorta, the large artery that carries oxygen-rich blood from the heart through the abdomen to major organs. Young adults who have only been smoking for a few years can show signs of narrowing of this large artery.[8] What happens to my heart if I quit smoking? Within 12 hours, the level of poisonous carbon monoxide in the body from cigarettes returns to normal. In other words, the benefits of quitting begin immediately.[9] After one year, your risk of heart attack is half that of a continuing smoker’s risk.[4] Fifteen years after quitting, your risk of coronary heart disease is that of a nonsmoker’s.[10]  
    [1] Heron MP, Hoyert DL, Murphy SL, Xu JQ, Kochanek KD, Tejada-Vera B.Deaths: Final data for 2006. National Vital Statistics Reports. 2009;57(14). Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. [2] Roger V, Go, A, Lloyd-Jones, D, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics—2011 update. a report from the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee.Circulation2011;123:e1-e192. [3] American Heart Association. Cigarette Smoking and Cardiovascular Disease. http://www.americanheart.com/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4545 [4] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010 [5] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [6] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Let’s Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free: Your Guide to the 50th Anniversary Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [7] WebMD.Smoking and Heart Disease. Last Reviewed: Sept. 15, 2014. www.webmd.com/smoking-cessation/quit-smoking-heart#sthash.gwtJWtU0.dpuf [8] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006 [9] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: Nicotine Addiction: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 1988 [10] Tobacco Control: Reversal of Risk After Quitting Smoking. IARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 11. 2007. p 11

    Fact Sheet: Tobacco Free Florida Program

    Includes facts about how tobacco impacts the state and how Tobacco Free Florida has helped many Floridians quit tobacco. Click to download ; Haz clic para descargar

    Powerful Anti-Smoking Ad Campaigns Work

    Hard-hitting anti-smoking media campaigns effectively raise awareness about the serious toll that tobacco use takes on one’s health and the many lives it affects. In the United States, tobacco use is responsible for about 480,000 deaths each year.[1] For every person who dies, about 30 more people suffer with at least one serious illness from smoking.[2] Smoking also affects the numerous nonsmokers exposed to hundreds of toxic chemicals in secondhand smoke. Since 1964, 2.5 million nonsmokers have died from exposure to secondhand smoke.[3] Can a graphic and emotional ad on TV really make a difference? The Florida Department of Health’s (FDOH) Tobacco Free Florida campaign uses aggressive ads that show the human impact of smoking as part of a comprehensive program. FDOH and the Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida (BTFF) select ads that have run in other states and countries and that have had a demonstrated positive effect on inspiring people to seek help in quitting smoking. Tobacco Free Florida has seen encouraging results in reducing tobacco use in the state. The adult cigarette smoking rate in Florida was at 16.8 percent in 2013. That was below the 2013 national average of 19 percent.[4] Florida’s adult cigarette smoking rate decreased by 13 percent – from 19.3 percent in 2011 to 16.8 percent in 2013. Another positive sign is the increased number of people served by Tobacco Free Florida’s 3 Ways to Quit, which are free and evidence-based resources that include the Florida Quitline, Web Coach and in-person classes via the Florida Area Health Education Centers (AHEC). For example, from July 2013 through June 2014, more than 93,100 Floridians used one of the 3 Ways to Quit.[5] Furthermore, Florida has seen great progress in reducing cigarette use among youth. Since Tobacco Free Florida began airing hard-hitting ads in 2010, the state’s youth cigarette smoking rate has been cut by about half – from 8.3 percent in 2010 to 4.3 percent in 2014 among Floridians ages 13-17.[6] The state had one of the lowest high school cigarette smoking rates in the country at 7.5 percent in 2014. That was below the national average of 9.2 percent in the equivalent 2014 national survey.[7] The decrease in smoking among young people in Florida is an encouraging indication of the effectiveness of our tobacco control program. Strong evidence proves that graphic, hard-hitting anti-tobacco ads work, and those that arouse strong negative emotions perform better than those that do not. Hard-hitting media campaigns are not only effective at promoting quit attempts, they also reduce youth initiation.[8] The Evidence
    • According to a report published in The Lancet medical journal in September 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) 2012 Tips From Former Smokers (Tips) campaign motivated 1.6 million smokers to make a quit attempt. More than 100,000 U.S. smokers will remain quit as a result of the 2012 campaign. An estimated 6 million nonsmokers talked with friends and family about the dangers of smoking.[9] Several Tips ads were chosen by FDOH and BTFF to run in Florida.
    • During March 4–June 23, 2013, CDC conducted its second annual Tips campaign. During the campaign, the average weekly numbers of calls and website visitors increased by 75 percent and almost 38-fold, respectively, compared with the 4 weeks before the campaign, and quickly decreased almost to pre-campaign levels once the campaign ended. This suggests that the campaign led to 151,536 additional quitline calls and nearly 2.8 million additional unique Tips website visitors above pre-campaign levels.[10] Several of these Tips ads were also chosen by FDOH and BTFF to run in Florida.
    • Studies show that emotionally evocative media campaigns featuring graphic images of smoking-related diseases are effective in motivating smokers to quit.[11],[12],[13],[14]
    • According to a study published in June 2010, ads that utilize a why-to-quit strategy with graphic images of the physical consequences of smoking and ads that use testimonials of personal loss from smoking were perceived as more effective among smokers than other ad categories.[15]
    • Campaigns that show the serious health consequences linked to smoking to motivate adults to quit have also been associated with prevention of smoking uptake among youth.[16]
    • Studies indicate that sad or frightening ads that are highly emotional and feature the serious health consequences of tobacco use score significantly higher among adults on perceived effectiveness compared to ads that are funny or neutral.[17]
    • In one study, smokers who reported being exposed to more highly emotional and personal testimonial ads were more likely to quit smoking at follow-up.[18]
    • Meta-analyses on the use of fear appeals in health campaigns conclude that fear appeals are most effective when accompanied by equally strong efficacy messages, such as information to call a quitline for help and support to quit.[19]
    • In New York, researchers found that graphic television ads were strongly associated with higher call volume to a quitline from 2001 to 2009.[20] Two of those ads, Reverse the Damage – Heart Attack and Reverse the Damage – Lung Cancer were chosen by FDOH and BTFF to run in Florida.
    • The Australia National Tobacco Campaign, which featured graphic hard-hitting ads depicting the negative health consequences of smoking, found that the campaign achieved high rates of recall and recognition, was appraised favorably by smokers, contributed to new learning about smoking and health, and increased agreement with campaign-related attitudes.[21],[22] Furthermore, even though the campaign was not targeted at teenagers, the vast majority of adolescents were aware of the campaign and thought it was relevant to them.[23] These ads, Artery and Sponge were chosen by FDOH and BTFF to run in Florida.
    To view some of Tobacco Free Florida’s ads, please visit www.tobaccofreeflorida.com/multimedia-tv-spots. ___________________________________________________________________________________ [1] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. [2] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. [3] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. [4] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Prevalence and Trends Data, 2013. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. [5] Professional Data Analysis [6] Florida Youth Tobacco Survey (FYTS), Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology, 2014. [7] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Tobacco Use Among Middle and High School Students—United States, 2011–2014. MMWR Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 64(14);381–385. 16 April 2015 [8] National Cancer Institute, The role of the media in promoting and reducing tobacco use. Tobacco\ Control Monograph No. 19. NIH Pub. No. 07-6242, 2008, USDHHS, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute: Bethesda MD. [9] McAfee T, Davis KC, Alexander Jr RL, Pechacek TF, Bunnell R. Effect of the first federally funded US antismoking national media campaign. Lancet 2013; September 9 [10] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Impact of a national tobacco education campaign on weekly numbers of quitline calls and website visitors–United States, March 4-June 23, 2013. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2013 Sep 20;62(37):763-7. [11] Community Preventive Services Task Force. Reducing tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure: mass-reach health communication interventions. Atlanta, GA: Task Force on Community Preventive Services; 2013. Available at http://www.thecommunityguide.org/tobacco/massreach.htm [12] National Cancer Institute. The role of the media in promoting and reducing tobacco use. Tobacco control monograph no. 19. Bethesda, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute; 2008. Available at http://www.cancercontrol.cancer.gov/tcrb/monographs/19/index.htm [13] Durkin S, Brennan E, Wakefield M. Mass media campaigns to promote smoking cessation among adults: an integrative review. Tob Control 2012;21:127–38. [14] Farrelly, M, Mann N, Watson K, Pechacek T. The influence of television advertisements on promoting calls to telephone quitlines. Health Educ Res 2013;28:15–22. [15] Davis, K. C., Nonnemaker, J. M., Farrelly, M. C., Niederdeppe, J. Exploring differences in smokers’ perceptions of the effectiveness of cessation media messages. Tob. Control 2010;0:tc.2009.035568v1-tc.2009.035568 [16] Wakefield, M.A., B. Loken, and R.C. Hornik, Use of mass media campaigns to change health behaviour. Lancet, 2010. 376(9748): p. 1261-71. [17] Biener, L., Anti-tobacco advertisements by Massachusetts and Philip Morris: what teenagers think. Tob Control, 2002. 11 Suppl 2: p. ii43-6. [18] Durkin, S.J., L. Biener, and M.A. Wakefield, Effects of different types of antismoking ads on reducing disparities in smoking cessation among socioeconomic subgroups. Am J Public Health, 2009. 99(12): p. 2217-23. [19] Witte, K. and M. Allen, A meta-analysis of fear appeals: implications for effective public health campaigns. Health Educ Behav, 2000. 27(5): p. 591-615. [20] Farrelly, M.C., et al., Promoting calls to a quitline: quantifying the influence of message theme, strong negative emotions and graphic images in television advertisements. Tob Control, 2011. 20(4): p. 279-84. [21] Tan, N., M. Wakefield, and J. Freeman, Changes Associated with the National Tobacco Campaign: Results of the Second Follow-up Survey. , Canberra, Editor 1999, Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care. [22] Wakefield, M., J. Freeman, and J. Boulton, Changes Associated with the National Tobacco Campaign: Pre and Post Campaign Surveys Compared. , Canberra, Editor 1999, Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care. [23] White, V., et al., Do adult focused anti-smoking campaigns have an impact on adolescents? The case of the Australian National Tobacco Campaign. Tob Control, 2003. 12 Suppl 2: p. ii23-9.  

    Why Smoking is Especially Bad If You Have Diabetes

    Smoking and Diabetes

    What Is Diabetes?

    Diabetes is a group of diseases in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Most of the food a person eats is turned into glucose (a kind of sugar) for the body’s cells to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin that helps glucose get into the body’s cells. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use the insulin very well. Less glucose gets into the cells and instead builds up in the blood.1

    There are different types of diabetes. Type 2 is the most common in adults and accounts for more than 90% of all diabetes cases. Fewer people have type 1 diabetes, which most often develops in children, adolescents, or young adults.2

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    How Is Smoking Related to Diabetes?

    We now know that smoking causes type 2 diabetes. In fact, smokers are 30–40% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than nonsmokers. And people with diabetes who smoke are more likely than nonsmokers to have trouble with insulin dosing and with controlling their disease.3

    The more cigarettes you smoke, the higher your risk for type 2 diabetes.3 No matter what type of diabetes you have, smoking makes your diabetes harder to control.

    If you have diabetes and you smoke, you are more likely to have serious health problems from diabetes. Smokers with diabetes have higher risks for serious complications, including:4

    • Heart and kidney disease
    • Poor blood flow in the legs and feet that can lead to infections, ulcers, and possible amputation (removal of a body part by surgery, such as toes or feet)
    • Retinopathy (an eye disease that can cause blindness)
    • Peripheral neuropathy (damaged nerves to the arms and legs that causes numbness, pain, weakness, and poor coordination)

    If you are a smoker with diabetes, quitting smoking will benefit your health right away. People with diabetes who quit have better control of their blood sugar levels.5

    For free help to quit, call 1-800-QUIT NOW (1-800-784-8669) or visit CDC.gov/tips. Spanish-speakers can call 1-855-DÉJELO-YA
    (1-855-335-3569) or visit CDC.gov/consejos.

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    How Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

    Don’t smoke. Smoking increases your chance of having type 2 diabetes.4

    Lose weight if you are overweight or obese.6

    Stay active. Physical activity can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in adults who are at high risk for the disease.6

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    How Is Diabetes Treated?

    Diabetes treatment and management can include:7

    • A healthy diet and physical activity program
    • Weight loss (if overweight or obese)
    • Medicines to control blood sugar by helping the body use insulin better
    • Insulin taken by injections or by using an insulin pump
    • Patient education to address problem-solving and coping skills needed to help manage diabetes and its complications
    • Medicines to control cholesterol and blood pressure

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    References

    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Basics About Diabetes [last updated 2012 Sept 6; accessed 2014 May 5].
    2. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Diabetes Overview [last updated 2014 Apr 2; accessed 2014 May 5].
    3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [accessed 2014 May 5].
    4. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A Report of the Surgeon General. How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010 [accessed 2014 May 5].
    5. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010 [accessed 2014 May 5].
    6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes Public Health Resource: Prevent Diabetes [last updated 2012 May 14; accessed 2014 May 5].
    7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes Public Health Resource: 2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet [last updated 2011 May 20; accessed 2014 May 5].

    On this Page

    Bill has diabetes. He quit smoking the day his leg was amputated.

    “Having diabetes and being a smoker—my doctors always warned me about the bad things that could happen. Did I listen? No!”

    Content provided and maintained by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Please see our system usage guidelines and disclaimer.

    What Tobacco Free Florida Can and Can’t Do

    As a government agency, the Florida Department of Health and the Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida cannot institute or advocate for new laws. We do, however, help inform the public about tobacco’s health risks and dangers, and local Tobacco Free Partnerships in each of Florida’s counties work to pass tobacco policies.

    While there is no law banning the sale of tobacco in Florida, there has been steady progress made in strengthening youth prevention, raising prices of tobacco, restrictions on marketing, and protecting the public from secondhand smoke. All of these efforts limit the impact of tobacco use. Part of this is accomplished through statewide legislation such as the Florida Clean Indoor Air Act (FCIAA), which prohibits smoking in all enclosed workplaces, and Florida’s $1 state cigarette tax increase in 2009, which contributed to the overall decline in smokers in the state.

    There has also been legal action in Florida against the tobacco industry and laws to protect the state’s comprehensive tobacco education and use prevention program. On August 25, 1997, Florida became the second state in the nation to settle a lawsuit against the tobacco industry. The tobacco lawsuits were intended to punish cigarette makers for decades of fraud and racketeering and to help states pay for the Medicaid and other public health expenses to cover sick smokers. Florida was among three other states – Texas, Mississippi and Minnesota – that settled with the tobacco industry before the Master Settlement Agreement of 1998 between the tobacco industry and the other 46 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

    In 2006, Florida voters overwhelmingly approved a state constitutional amendment requiring that a percentage of the state’s settlement fund must be used for a comprehensive tobacco education and use prevention program. The funding was used to create Tobacco Free Florida. In 2012, Florida’s adult-smoking rate was at 17.7 percent, well below the national average of 19.6 percent. Further, the smoking rate for high school students in Florida dropped to 8.6 percent in 2013, below the national average of 23.3 percent, and the number of youth who have pledged never to smoke increased from 55 percent in 2006 to 67.7 percent.

    Local communities can also strengthen many of their laws. We support these efforts by coordinating with and funding local Tobacco Free Partnerships in every county to provide education on these issues.

    If you are interested in helping implement change in your community, we encourage you to get involved with your local Tobacco Free Partnership, which works to make tobacco use less acceptable and tobacco products less accessible to youth. For more information, please visit www.tobaccofreeflorida.com/getinvolved.

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    Fact Sheet: Health Care Providers

    Includes facts about the importance of health care provider interventions and how providers can Team Up to help patients quit.

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